1 & 2 Peter and Jude by Schreiner (CSC)

Only recently did I notice that the NAC series, which I’ve always loved, is being revised and re-cast as the Christian Standard Commentary (CSC). This first revision is on 1 & 2 Peter and Jude and updates the popular commentary by highly-respected scholar Thomas Schreiner. I had the privilege of using the part on Jude extensively a few years ago. I’m glad this commentary is receiving this revision.

I found the case to be exactly what the author stated in his preface. He has updated and revised, he has rewritten sentences, he has surveyed more recent scholarship, but he has not changed his mind. I carefully reviewed the bibliography and several of the footnotes. If that is your need, you will want this new commentary because there seems to be significant interaction with later works. If you are a pastor or teacher, what is revised might not be your main focus. Still, this volume has always been one of the most highly-rated in the NAC and sets the bar high for this new CSC.

As for this new CSC series, these new volumes are attractive. I always liked the look of the NAC and thought it looked better than several other series on the shelf, but these new volumes are even nicer and have a crisp, smooth look. I like the dust jackets, I like the binding, I like the font of the text, I like the font of the footnotes, and I like the overall layout and look of the whole book. Some series print volumes that look like little more than an afterthought, but this volume is sharp!

The work is top-notch here, and this volume is essential on Peter and Jude!

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Discovering the New Testament (Volume 2) by Mark Keown

This volume continues the excellence found in the first volume on the Gospels and Acts. If anything, this volume is even better because it lies in the author’s area of expertise. He has written a major exegetical commentary on Philippians that is outstanding. This volume covers only the Pauline Epistles, which are worthy of their own volume.

There is a biographical chapter on Paul’s life and conversion which discusses all issues of chronology as well. Chapter 2 gives an overall induction to all of these epistles. Chapters 3 through 13 take each of these epistles in turn. In each case, we are presented with occasion and context, structure, rhetorical devices, form of letters, authorship, a discussion on its placement in the Pauline corpus, and concluded with some questions to consider. To me they seemed well reasoned, judicious, and mature.

There’s a chapter on Paul’s thought in theology that approaches theology by key subjects. As you would expect, the main topics are here as well as the New Perspective on Paul. Appropriately, there is a concluding chapter on Paul’s missionary strategy.

When I encountered the first volume, I felt it would be a replacement for Merrill Tenny’s widely used New Testament introduction. On reflection, this set will be so much more than that. The three volume set by Hiebert that was found in so many personal libraries a few decades back is a closer comparison, except that this set is at once more up-to-date and better. I am impressed with everything I’ve seen from Mark Keown’s hand. This fine volume does nothing to lessen that opinion. To my mind, this will be when concluded THE New Testament introduction set.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.