A Matter of Life and Death by Bill Goldsborough

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Written primarily for Fundamental Baptists, this volume seeks to address a glaring misunderstanding among many. The subtitle “thoughts for thinking fundamentalists” makes me think that Bill Goldsborough would like to move more fundamentalists over to the “thinking” category.

In chapter one we are told that “identity is determined by birth, not by behavior,” and from that basis he seeks to get us thinking. That basis for identity should give peace and an entirely different approach to the Christian life than the one so many are living. Many Christians have something far short of peace and strive for what could never be earned, though it is freely given. It’s a tragedy he hopes to Scripturally help us get past.

He focuses much on old man verses new man and what he believes the Bible teaches on that subject. He also explains carefully what it means to “reckon” Christ in your life. That can be quite revolutionary for a believer.

He marshals an incredible amount of Scripture to make his case, and unlike some works I’ve seen, those references actually discuss his subject. It also kind of had the feel of old Keswick writings as you go through this book.

He writes with an encouraging and helpful spirit. You might disagree on the interpretation of a particular passage he references, but you will appreciate the warmth of this book. If we see our relationship with Christ more along the lines he describes, we will definitely be blessed.

 

 

 

 

Impossible People by Os Guinness

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This book is the one precisely needed today. It speaks to what thinking Christians are dwelling on. His title won’t make any sense until you read his reference to Peter Damian, but the book will strike the right cord on many levels. The problems are as bad as we imagined, yet the answer is not despair, but courage.

He will explain how Western culture is in its death throws. He really doesn’t explain a way to save it as we are too far down the line for that, but Western culture or not, Christians have an obligation just as they did in the hedonistic days of the Roman Empire.

He writes about how Christians are failing dramatically these days. He compares the very thing some of us have been telling others–how did German Christians get duped into accepting Nazism. Sounds so familiar, doesn’t it?

Os Guinness never fails to challenge me and this title is no exception. This book,  particularly, is needed whether that sounds trite or not. There is so much more here that I don’t even know what to say other than I underlined line after line as I read. This is a winner and I give it the highest recommendation.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

I’ve Written My First Book

I’ve wanted to write for some time, but have told almost no one. I have a few things in the pipeline, but this first title is on an underappreciated title of the OT–Obadiah. Though little, Obadiah has an incredible message to share with us.

We did the book through createspace.com, an Amazon company, and I am pleased with the product they put out. That attractive cover was designed by my wife Alicia and she helped in many ways. I also owe a lot to my children for especially encouraging me on this project. I dedicated the book to Alicia and my children.

The book is sold online directly through Amazon and here is the link:

Obadiah by Jimmy Reagan

If you live near me, I have a few copies on hand I can sell myself. I also plan to offer it soon as an e-book for those who favor that option. I have to figure out the technology at Amazon first.

To tell you the truth, I’m a little nervous about this project. I’m no where near a known author and have no idea if anyone will even want to read it. Still, I offer it and pray it will be a blessing to those who study God’s Word.

God bless,

Jimmy

From Pentecost To Patmos by Craig Blomberg

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Craig Blomberg followed up his highly successful volume on the Gospels with this title that covers the rest of the New Testament. While it might not be as good as his earlier volume as the Gospels are clearly his specialty, this Introduction is still one I found to be quite an asset.

He presents his material in the typical style taking one NT book at a time. The length of his chapters varies in a fashion corresponding to the length and importance of the NT book discussed. He used good judgment and covered what should be there for us. In fact, pastors and Bible students will love it despite some occasional sidewalks into critical study that some of us put little stock into.

He gave some of his most helpful information when he discussed the structure of the book. I also felt the overview commentary on each book was quite effective in one getting his or her bearings straight. There were more maps than in his earlier volume and some of the charts provided were eye opening for the study of the NT books.

I highly recommend this as a worthy study tool!

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Related Post:

Jesus and the Gospels (2nd ed.)

Jesus and the Gospels (2nd ed.) by Craig Blomberg

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When it comes to New Testament Introduction, the Gospels are so critically important that they are definitely worth a whole volume to themselves. Blomberg has supplied that need as well as any. I read the first edition years ago and was particularly enriched by it. The second edition here is not an extensive revision, though that is a good thing as there are many things too helpful to be changed. The extra material is mostly scholarly developments over the decade between editions.

Part One is outstanding on the historical background including political, religious, and socioeconomic information. He related what you need to step back into that day. Part Two had two chapters on historical and literary critical methods. That was the weakest section to me as there are many elements of that I simply can’t agree with. Still, it was a thorough explanation for what has gone on in the scholarly world involving the Gospels.

Part Three gives a chapter each to specific Introduction for each Gospel. That was likely the section of greatest value for this book. His section on the life of Christ also integrates the individual Gospels approach to it. The final part on historical trustworthiness and theology round out the fine volume.

The book has won awards in the past and this reviewer finds them to be well deserved.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Related Post:

From Pentecost to Patmos

 

Representing Christ by Anizor and Voss

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Anizor and Voss write here on a doctrine, the priesthood of the believer, that is precious to some of us, yet under duress in many places. Whole segments of Christendom deny its existence. This book shows that is both a biblical idea and an idea believed by several across the centuries.

This book is at its best discussing what the Scriptural basis of the doctrine of the priesthood of the believer is. Chapter 2 entitled “A Royal Priesthood” lays out well the case for clear teaching on this doctrine. I had never considered Adam as a priest, but Israel was clearly “a kingdom of priests.” Even more important is when the authors draw out the New Testament teaching on the subject. To me, it is undeniable as they well show.

The balance of the book looks at the subject in more of a church history vein. Luther might not deserve quite as much credit as they give him, but he does play into the history. They also explain what all priesthood really means in our lives, which is the reason for the subtitle “a vision for the priesthood of the believer.”

They take care to write to those who might be in a group that has priests today and deny that all Christians are priests. Some of that explanation might not be necessary to one not in one of those groups.

They write well and make a good contribution to this important dialog. This is a fine theological volume to have.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Herbert Hoover in the White House by Rappleye (Presidential Bio Series)

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Hoover, so often vilified and ranked as one of the worst presidents, just begs for a good biography. You just know there’s more to the story than we have heard. Charles Rappleye gives us a biography of Hoover’s turbulent presidency and only enough of his life before and after to contrast it with his one term in office. He went into office with tremendous respect and admiration and left it with little love lost.

Rappleye did not write as a fan of his subject, but with keen research he did strive to present a balanced picture. Besides, perhaps, going too far in some of his psychological analysis of Hoover, Rappleye brought Hoover to life in this book.

Hoover was a hard worker, had a peculiar personality that was really not a good match for the presidency, and was somewhat petty. At the same time, he had core principles, determination, and great brains. He was also a most unfortunate victim. The Depression was in no way caused by him and was ready to explode before he even took office. There were international factors out of his control too. Really, everything lined up against him and likely no politican could have stopped it. His popular successor was much better at calming the people, but did not stop the Depression either throughout the 1930s.

I left this biography feeling sorry for Hoover and thinking that many of the things he stood for would have been better than what transpired after him. He just lacked a real connection with the American people.

This well-written biography fills in many of the questions you may have. It is a solid contribution.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.