Mark (TNTC) by Schnabel

book tntc mark

Here’s a brand new volume in the second cycle of revisions on the beloved Tyndale New Testament Commentaries (TNTC) series. The new editor, Eckhard Schnabel, contributes this new volume. I really am not familiar with Schnabel, but have thought that whoever had the task of filling the shoes of Leon Morris really had their hands full in light of his incredible scholarship. After perusing this volume, I have great hope for a series I really respect.

There’s no doubt this volume really improves on the earlier Cole volume. Schnabel was given more space and made good use of it. I find it superior to its competitors in other similar series as well. I’ve just recently reviewed the IVPNT volume on Mark and much prefer this one.

His Introduction begins by discussing Mark’s place among the Gospels and its history of interpretation. He describes and personally holds to the priority of Mark. He reached conservative conclusions on authorship, date, and historical reliability. His section on theological emphases is well done and he ends with a clear outline.

The commentary proper makes up the bulk of the book and is not only helpful, but well written. That is a winning trait missing in many commentaries. Every passage I reviewed was never superficial nor prolix. I thought many details and good points were brought out for the reader.

For its target audience, this would have to be highly rated. I recommend it!

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Sermons for Advent and Christmas Day by Luther

book luther

We’ve all heard so much about Martin Luther. I’ve even read his biography entitled “Here I Stand” by Bainton, also published by Hendrickson Publishers, and enjoyed it. What I had not done, however, is read any of his sermons. I’m glad to possess this book so I can get a feel of Luther for myself. Plus sermons for the Christmas season are always a blessing for sermon ideas or devotional reading.

The book begins with a fine preface that gives a biographic overview of Luther. It’s extremely serviceable if you need to brush up on Luther before you get started reading the sermons. From there the sermons are designed to correspond with the first, second, third, and fourth Sunday of Advent followed by two sermons specifically for Christmas Day.

In the first sermon Luther takes us to Matthew 21:1-9 and the Triumphal Entry of Christ. The goal, I believe, is to make us remember the why of Advent, or the why of Christ’s coming to us. Over the course of the sermon, Luther explains the mistaken views some Jews had over the Messiah. It’s in this sermon you will find that his sermons were quite long (100 points in 32 pages). Still, there’s a lot of content.

His second sermon takes us to Luke 21:25-36 where he draws out the comfort Christians can take from the signs of the Day of Judgment. The third one considers Matthew 11:2-10 and looks at how Jesus answers John’s question on if He was the Messiah they were looking for, or should they look for another. This text could, in my judgement, be used more for Advent than the previous one. The fourth sermon looks at John 1:19-28 and is something of a sequel to the last one in examining John the Baptist’s confession of Christ.

The last two sermons are Christmas messages expounding Luke 2:1-4 and John 1:1-14 respectively. There are many things to ponder in his look at Luke 2, though I could not accept them all. Still, it’s well worth reading. The last one is a perfect Christmas text rarely preached on Christmas. It is THE text of the Incarnation and Luther does well making much of Christ in it.

Beyond being an asset at Christmas time, this book is a great place to sample Luther. With two good reasons like that, I’d recommend you get this book!

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Christ Exalted Sermons of Jonathan Edwards–A Review

book edwards sermons

Hurrah for more Jonathan Edwards sermons! Hendrickson Publishers already graced us with Revival Sermons of Jonathan Edwards a few months ago and now they have unearthed some other jewels for us. I’m a pastor who believes in having a healthy dose of sermons in my library, and have could we have a real sermonic library without some Edwards?

There’s no doubt that his sermons are uniquely his own. I can’t think of anyone who would organize a sermon quite like he would. He sees no problem in being long. His style usually involves beginning with some doctrine on the subject and then branching out into pointed, applicable material to take the Scripture home to the hearer’s hearts. I wouldn’t recommend that any of us preach a sermon put together as his are, but his logical mind and scriptural acumen are helpful to us all. Read him more for personal, theological, and doctrinal reflection rather than a prototype for preaching today.

These sermons, as the title implies, exalt Jesus Christ. The first sermon tackles a fine text most likely only rarely preached–Isaiah 32:2. If the title “Safety, Fullness, and Sweet Refreshment in Christ” sounds odd, I assure you he found all three in Christ for us. I love his preaching on one of my favorite texts in Revelation 5:5-6 and drawing out the excellency of Christ. He brings alive so much of Christ’s character in it. In the sermon “Jesus Christ the Same Yesterday, Today, and Forever” he not only exposes how Christ transcends time, but lays out how that fact should impact our lives.

The next sermon “Christ Exalted” explains how He is exalted in His work of redemption. It’s a treat to have the sermon he preached at David Brainerd’s funeral from 2 Corinthians 5:8. He makes clear our assurance of going directly into the presence of Christ at death. There are some post-sermon comments added as well. Preachers will find encouragement from his “Christ, the Example of Ministers” from John 13:15-16. The last sermon, “Christ’s Agony” takes us to Gethsemane in Luke 22:44. I disagree on a few points, but there is much to ponder.

Edwards’ sermon had the hand of God on them when he preached them and it’s a privilege for us to revel in these proven sermons. This book is a nice, durable, attractive paperback and I recommend it.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.