Preventing Suicide: A Handbook For Pastors, Chaplains, And Pastoral Counselors

This is, of course, an unpleasant subject, yet in reading this volume I realized how poorly prepared I am as a pastor to deal with this crisis in my ministry should it, God forbid, happen. As I thought about it, I recalled pastor friends who have faced this very trial. I can only imagine the anguish of soul of these shepherds, not to mention the families whose world is suddenly turned upside down.

This volume by Karen Mason and published by IVP is astonishingly effective in its goal of bridging the gap between theology and psychology in addressing this timely issue. The psychology was restrained and effective while the theology was quite good from the author whose experience ran a little more in psychology.

The book is practical in its emphasis on prevention, ministering, and the role of churches and pastors. We get a good overview of what suicide is and who most often dies by suicide (she tells us not to say “commit suicide”).

The chapter on “Shattering Myths About Suicide” embarrassed me because I held to most of them! She well described the common positions of those who hold suicide is not a sin as well as those who do including those who wrongly say a true Christian cannot die by suicide. There are real aids to families who fear this erroneous doctrine to be gleaned here.

There is detailed help in dealing with a suicidal feelings as well as ministering to those struggling after being left behind. The ever present issue of an unfair stigma on a grieving family is well presented here too.

I recommend all my pastor friends, as well as those who have need to deal with issue, grab a copy of this fine resource.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

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2 thoughts on “Preventing Suicide: A Handbook For Pastors, Chaplains, And Pastoral Counselors

  1. I would really like to read this book! Living with mental illness is hard to say the least. I have attempted suicide before but I know without a doubt my Savior is mine! Being saved by the blood of the Lamb does not mean that you cannot stumble and fall.

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